Twitch dubbed over Metallica stream, and the internet thinks that's a shame

by Jack Morse | about 13 hours ago

An absolute shame.
An absolute shame.Image: Thomas Trutschel / getty
ByJack Morse13 hours ago

You just hate to see it. 

The Amazon-owned streaming platform Twitch made a mess of things Friday during a livestream, and it couldn't have happened to a nicer band. Specifically, Metallica, known for (among other things) its 2000 lawsuit against the music-sharing service Napster, was streaming a concert for Blizzard Entertainment's annual news event, BlizzCon, when Twitch Gaming dubbed over the heavy metal with what sounded like elevator music. 

the current state of Twitch: the official Twitch Gaming channel cut off the live Metallica concert to play 8bit folk music to avoid DMCA pic.twitter.com/sCn56So8Ee

— Rod Breslau (@Slasher) February 19, 2021

While the immediate cause of the mess-up was unclear, fans were quick to speculate that the swap was a result of automated systems attempting to avoid any copyright issues inherent in streaming Metallica's music. 

There's something really funny about Metallica being dubbed over during Blizzcon due to copyright concerns. The band famously went to war with file sharing service Napster 21 years ago to prevent copyright infringement on their music. Kind of a Frankenstein's monster situation.

— Colin McNeil (@McNeilColin) February 20, 2021

Metallica not being able to play their own music live because of DMCA that came about in large part due to Metallica's advocacy of it is a hell of a full circle.

— Charlotte Clymer 🏳️‍🌈 (@cmclymer) February 20, 2021

1) this is hilarious for several reasons2) metallica, of all bands, getting stomped by copyright shit is *LITERALLY THE BEST*3) fuck metallica. https://t.co/s9Dm1Bl3QB

— D̒͂̕ᵈăᵃn̕ᶰ Ť̾̾̓͐͒͠ᵗe͗̑́̋̂́͡ᵉn̅ᶰtᵗl̀̓͘ᶫe̓̒̂̚ᵉrʳ (@Viss) February 20, 2021

Others just enjoyed the moment. 

lmao blizzcon muted metallica's live virtual concert and is just playing random low-key music over the whole thing pic.twitter.com/UqKnJf24VS

— RickyFTW (@rickyftw) February 19, 2021

Look I don't want to come across as a hater, but I really think I liked metallica's older stuff better pic.twitter.com/Ijr6yCTo8r

— FamilyJules (@FamilyJules7x) February 20, 2021

Importantly, however, the Future of Music Coalition — a "nonprofit organization supporting a musical ecosystem where artists flourish and are compensated fairly and transparently for their work" — was quick to point out that the reality of the situation isn't as cut and dry as many on the internet first assumed. 

"When people are encouraged to direct all their ire at the DMCA (not at Amazon's failure to implement it correctly) or at the music biz, it improves Amazon's bargaining position in licensing negotiations, and imperils Congress's ability to achieve needed reforms," wrote the nonprofit

When people are encouraged to direct all their ire at the DMCA (not at Amazon's failure to implement it correctly) or at the music biz, it improves Amazon's bargaining position in licensing negotiations, and imperils Congress's ability to achieve needed reforms.

— Future of Music Coalition (@future_of_music) February 20, 2021

Oh yeah, and there's more. 

"Just did a giant thread on Metallica and copyright and forgot to mention the most basic fact which is that the DMCA was '98 and the Napster suit was 2000," it added. "Metallica isn't responsible for the DMCA by any stretch of the imagination!"

Just did a giant thread on Metallica and copyright and forgot to mention the most basic fact which is that the DMCA was ‘98 and the Napster suit was 2000! Metallica isn’t responsible for the DMCA by any stretch of the imagination!

— Future of Music Coalition (@future_of_music) February 20, 2021

In other words, it's possible to think that both Metallica and the DMCA are problematic without losing sight of the real internet villain: Amazon. 

Now that's a message we can truly rock out to. 

Disclaimer: This story is auto-aggregated by a computer program and has not been created or edited by WebFeed.app.

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